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Double Book Launch

Posted by Rowena Cory Daniells on January 25, 2012

Anyone going to be in Tassie on Thursday 2nd of Feb?

We’re pleased to spread the news that Margo Lanagan will now be joining us on February 2nd for a launch of her new book, Sea Hearts. Margo and Tansy Rayner Roberts will share the evening, making it a very exciting double launch for us — don’t miss it!
Thursday February 2nd
5:30pm
The Hobart Bookshop*
Rowena Cory Daniells will launch Reign of Beasts by Tansy Rayner Roberts.
This is the final book in Rayner-Roberts’ The Creature Court trilogy.
Richard Harland will launch Margo Lanagan‘s Sea Hearts — an an extraordinary tale of desire and revenge, of loyalty, heartache and human weakness, and of the unforeseen consequences of all-consuming love.
 
So if you happen to be around, drop into the Hobart Bookshop and toast to Tansy and Margo’s new books!
*The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
P 03 6223 1803 . F 03 6223 1804
hobooks@ozemail.com.au
www.hobartbookshop.com.au
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Posted in Australian Spec Fic Scene, Authors and Public Speaking, Book Launches, Covers, Creativity, Fantasy Genre, Nourish the Writer, Promoting your Book, Publishers | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Ian Irvine: Marketing for Authors, Part One

Posted by Rowena Cory Daniells on November 12, 2011

Today we have the indefagitable Ian Irvine, who is sharing is hard-won wisdom with us. Take it away, Ian …

Internet Marketing Basics for Authors

A.         Introduction

Building a strong presence on the net is a long-term proposition. Unless you’re a celebrity or a genius it’ll take you a year or more to build your author platform and gain a significant following. To do so you need to establish presences in a number of places, because they have different functions in your book marketing strategy.

But it’s not enough to establish your sites on the net – you also need to promote and cross-promote them, regularly respond to comments and questions, and update these sites frequently. If a fan returns to your site after a month or two and finds nothing new, or worse, stuff that’s obviously out of date, they’re unlikely to return. But remember, to build your audience, the great majority of your updates should be engaging, relevant, informative and free.

B.        Your Author Platform

What are these functions – what does online networking actually do? What is an author platform, for that matter?

Your author platform is the way you’re currently reaching an audience. For most people, other than celebrities, this is your online presence, whether it’s your website, Facebook, Twitter, blog, YouTube, or several of these.

C.        Online Networking

According to Dana Lynn Smith, in The Savvy Book Marketer’s Guide to Successful Social Marketing, online networking allows you to:

  • Build your author platform and recognition of your brand (i.e., your name as the author of certain kinds of books);
  • Develop relationships with peers, influencers, potential customers and people with common interests;
  • Drive traffic to your website, blog and Facebook page;
  • Share your expertise and knowledge, and help other people
  • Directly and indirectly, promote your books (and any other services you may offer).

D.         Seven Key Activities

The following activities are the most important for book marketing. Ideally, you’ll do all of these, assuming you have the time. It takes a lot of work.

  1. Your website
  2. Your Facebook Fan page
  3. Your blog
  4. Your Twitter feed
  5. Your email newsletter
  6. Your GoodReads page
  7. Your YouTube page

E.        One at a Time

I don’t recommend you work on everything at once. After you’ve created your website, start on one other activity – your blog, or Twitter, or your Facebook fan page – and when it’s working well you can move on to the next. But if there’s one activity you’re not comfortable with e.g. creating and posting videos to YouTube, don’t worry about it. You can’t do everything and it’s better to do a few things well than many things badly.

Remember that social media like Facebook, Twitter, your blog, YouTube feed and GoodReads page aren’t for direct marketing, but for connecting to other like-minded people. Only a tiny fraction of your updates to social media sites should be direct marketing – i.e., versions of ‘Buy my book!’ The great majority of your updates should be useful, informative or entertaining.

For direct marketing, you’ll use your website and especially your email newsletter. And perhaps some carefully targeted advertising on Facebook or GoodReads.

F.         Develop a Plan

Before you begin, do some planning:

  1. Work out your goals, e.g., to:
    1. Meet people, network, keep in touch and build relationships in the areas you’re interested in;
    2. Help others by sharing your knowledge and experience;
    3. Build your author platform and brand recognition;
    4. Promote your books, indirectly or directly;
    5. Gain a large audience and drive relevant traffic to your main author platforms (website, blog, Facebook fan page, newsletter etc).

 

  1. Develop your social media strategy to reach these goals, considering your available time and resources. Work out the topics you’re going to post about, then stay on message. Don’t do unrelated posts.

 

  1. General principle in social media: give more than you get. Reach out to people and ask – who can I help? Do this by sharing your expertise and experience. Promote only rarely, and when you do, be subtle.

 

  1. Ask yourself who you’re trying to connect with. The aim is to end up with as many high quality followers as possible. People follow you for what you have to say of interest to them; e.g., for me on Twitter and my blog:
    1. Authors and other people I’m friends with or interested in;
    2. Influential and perceptive writers on the publishing industry, technology and the future;
    3. Experts on book promotion and marketing, especially in social media;
    4. People with something to say about writing and storytelling;
    5. Reviewers/editors/publishers/book bloggers etc;
    6. Key bookshops and booksellers.
    7. People who love the genres I write in.
    8. Other writers trying to find a way through the maze.

G.         Developing your Platform

The way you’ll develop your platform will depend on your own time, skills and resources. I’ve used my own sites as examples of how these can be done well (or poorly, in some cases – I’m still learning, and I welcome your comments).

  1. Your website – the first and most reliable source of information about you and your books.

Build a strong, user-friendly website that loads quickly, has lots of useful content (including first chapters of all your books, links to places where readers can buy them, and plenty of images, audio and video) and is regularly updated with news or other content (ideally, weekly). As an example, I’ve put a huge effort into both the design and content of my website, and you may find some inspiration for your own site here:  Also:

◦         Add a button to collect Likes for your Facebook page,

◦         Add other useful widgets such as Google Translate, especially if you have a lot of international readers. The translations aren’t brilliant but they’re better than nothing;

◦         Make it easy to share with sharing and bookmarking buttons (I use this ), and RSS;

◦         It’s a pain trying to determine if your favourite site has been updated recently. Add a box that shows what the latest updates are and where they can be found;

◦         Optimise it for mobile devices.

  1. Twitter – probably the fastest and simplest way to build your audience, to meet and develop relationships with other authors, influencers and potential book buyers, to keep up to date, get help, create a buzz about your book or content, and to drive traffic to your other sites. It’s also a good place to help others by sharing your knowledge and expertise, thus enhancing your reputation as an expert. It’s also easy compared to other social media: the learning curve is small and tweeting need not take a lot of time.

To gain followers, post valuable or useful content (your own articles and links, plus interesting and relevant material you’ve come across, but not ads or personal trivia) several times a day – with your other tweets being replies, retweets etc. Be yourself: authentic, friendly and helpful.

You can write and schedule your updates in advance with HootSuite. The Twitter Guide for Authors is helpful and relevant.

Twitter can become a time-wasting distraction, but many writers find it extremely useful for meeting like-minded people, making other industry contacts, and as an instantaneous publicist. I use it mainly for telling people about interesting blog, Facebook or website content (other peoples’ as well as my own content), learning from experts in my areas of interest, and driving traffic to my site and blog. Ian on Twitter.

  1. Your Blog – a great way to gain followers, network with influencers, drive traffic to your sites and be found by search engines. Also a good place to help others by sharing your knowledge and expertise. Blogs are relatively easy to set up and maintain, but using them effectively requires a significant time commitment – ideally, at least 5 hours a week.

Create a structured blog on a topic or topics of broad appeal, with lots of useful content and helpful or thought-provoking (or controversial) articles, that’s regularly updated (ideally, several days a week), and provide quick responses to readers’ comments.

Remember, your readers don’t give a damn about you. They’ll scan your blog in 10 seconds and leave if it doesn’t seem useful. Make each article clear, simple and relevant, and definitely not an advertisement for your own books. I’ve only begun blogging recently, but the great majority of my posts contain useful information about writing, publishing and books in general: See Ian Irvine blogspot

To increase your audience, ask what interests your readers. Free Social Media Examiner.Also:

◦         Google ‘effective blog design’ and set up a clear, well-structured, uncluttered blog that’s easy to read, and easy to find content on.

◦         Make it clear at a glance what your blog is about and who you are.

◦         Make it easy to search, bookmark, share and subscribe to your blog, so visitors will return.

◦         Make it mobile friendly. Up to a third of all visitors come from mobile devices.

◦         Blog comments. Reply promptly to comments on your posts. It’s also helpful to post comments frequently to other relevant blogs (but not comments that are really ads for your book).

◦         Blog tours. Organise a blog tour where, over a few weeks soon after your book has been published, you do guest posts and respond to readers’ comments on 10 – 20 other relevant blogs. Blog tours are also very useful to get a buzz going, though quite a bit of work – for the two tours I did earlier this year, I wrote 40,000 words of posts. For more info.

Next Sunday Part Two of Ian’s Marketing for Authors.

Feel free to send questions through to Ian.

Ian Irvine is an Australian marine scientist who has also written 27 novels, including the international bestselling Three Worlds epic fantasy sequence, a trilogy of thrillers about catastrophic climate change, Human Rites, and 12 novels for children. His latest children’s series is the humorous adventure fantasy quartet, Grim and Grimmer. Ian’s latest epic fantasy is Vengeance, Book 1 of The Tainted Realm.

Posted in Australian Spec Fic Scene, Authors and Public Speaking, Book Launches, Covers, Promoting your Book, Publishers, Publishing Industry, Sales, Visiting Writer, Writing Craft, Writing Opportunities | Tagged: , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

How do readers connect with a book (by a new author)?

Posted by Rowena Cory Daniells on October 14, 2011

 

My guess is that the greatest service we can do a book is to talk about it - on our blogs, to our friends, when we are on panels and to bookstore staff. Let people know the book is out there and it's good!

George Ivanoff did a post about  book trailers for ROR recently.  Nigel commented that his reading forum were discussing this and:

1) Most people didn’t even know book trailers existed

2) Those that did know they existed did not seek them out

3) Some book trailers were obviously more interesting to watch than others, but no one believed that this was likely to influence what books they ended up purchasing

 

I chimed in with the point that people under 20 reacted well to book trailers. Nigel agreed, but argued this didn’t mean that they went out and bought the book, as they were looking on the trailer more as a short movie.

So how do readers connect with a book (by a new author) before they make the decision to buy it?

The following is in no way scientific, but a guess:

  • 75% recommendations from friends (In this I include blog sites where readers follow a certain reviewer as that reviewer becomes the equivalent of a trusted friend – at least where books are concerned).
  • 10% from book staff. (Those little tags on shelves and Indy stores where they know the staff)
  • 5% from reading a blog post when the author does a guest post somewhere that arouses their interest, or reading their tweets and thinking they sound intriguing.
  • 5% from reviews (the old fashioned kind in newspapers)
  • 5% from picking up the book because the cover is interesting, reading the blub/front page and taking a chance on a new author

(It does add up to 100%, I checked. Some years ago I embarassed myself on a panel doing a quick breakdown of my reading genre habits but the total didn’t reach 100% and of course, someone in the audience pointed this out).

You’ll notice I haven’t included book trailers in this. That’s because the reader would have to seek them out on You Tube, which means they have to know about the book to find the trailer. The other way they would come across the book trailer is on a blog review site, or the writer’s own web site. So the reader is already engaging with the book/author at this point.

If a reader comes across the book trailer at this stage and, like the review or the author’s tweets, it appears in intriguing then the trailer would contribute towards the reader’s decision to buy that book.

As I said, this is all guesswork. What I’d like from you ‘gentle reader’ is your input on what influences you to take a punt on a new author’s book. Have I given too much credence to traditional reviews in newspapers? I must admit, I’ve bought only two books in my life, based on newspaper reviews and both were nonfiction.

Over to you…

Posted in Authors and Public Speaking, Book Launches, Book Trailers, Covers, Nourish the Writer, Promoting your Book | Tagged: , , , , | 55 Comments »

Inner Editor

Posted by Rowena Cory Daniells on May 14, 2011

(Cross posted from Mad Genius Club – Writer’s’ Division)

This is the cover of book three of my new trilogy The Outcast Chronicles. With thanks to Clint Langley the artist and Solaris, the publisher!

I’m on the home stretch now, cleaning up book three ready to send to the publisher. Yesterday I was working on a scene when I realised I needed to add a new scene near the beginning to foreshadow an event and build tension. I’m a pantser. I have an idea where I’m going and a feel for what I want to say, then I go on a journey with the characters discovering the story as it unfolds.

I’m not alone in this. In an interview with Joe Abercrombie, George RR Martin said: ‘There are two types of writers – the gardeners and the architects. The architect plans the entire house before he drives a nail; he draws up blueprints, he knows how deep the basement is going to be dug and how many rooms there are going to be, where the plumbing is going to be. And then there are the gardeners who dig a hole, plant a seed and water it with their blood, and then they see what comes up, and they kind of shape it. I’m much more of a gardener. ‘ To see the full interview go here.

I don’t know if I could write any other way. It is a leap of faith, but I trust my Inner Editor to let me know when something isn’t working. And, after I’ve mowed the yard or cleaned the kitchen, the answer will come to me. I’ll know what’s needed to pull the story together.

For many years now, I haven’t been able to read books without seeing the writing craft that went into it, just as I can’t watch movies without seeing the art direction, the camera angles, the characterisation and plotting. When I do discover a book or a movie that makes me forget the craft because the story sweeps me away, then I consider myself really lucky. (And of course I have to watch/read it again to discover the hidden craft).

I’m beginning to think there is such a thing as the ‘story gene’. Sure you can learn all the writing or movie making craft, but some people just have the ability to tell a good story. Do you think there is an innate aspect to writing?

And just for fun – here’s a look at people and their on-line avatars.

Posted in Australian Spec Fic Scene, Covers, Creativity, Editing and Revision, Writing Craft | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Dynamic Double Novella from Twelfth Planet Press

Posted by Rowena Cory Daniells on January 29, 2011

Following on from the Washington Association Small Press Short Fiction Award for Siren Beat, by Tansy Rayner Roberts, Twelfth Planet Press (TPP) have released Above and Below, available here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today we have the Dynamic Duo of Ben Peek and Stephanie Campisi to talk about the writing process behind these linked novellas. (Watch out for the give-away at the end).

A city has fallen from the sky.

 

Above , the alphabetic first half of Twelfth Planet Press’s latest release, focuses on Devian Lell, a window cleaner. Living in one of the many the floating cities that form Loft, he is drawn into the political turmoil that erupts when Dirt sends a diplomat to negotiate the trade of minerals that keep their cities afloat. Below, the alphabetical second half, features Eli Kurran, a security guard mourning the death of his wife to the toxicity of Dirt. Blackmailed by his former employer, he is forced to provide security for a diplomat from Loft, a woman three times his age, and easily the oldest living person ever to come to Dirt.

Above, written by Stephanie Campisi and Below, written by Ben Peek, is designed to be read in any order, to be read twice, in fact, and is a novel that will challenge your certainty of who, in Loft and in Dirt, is right.

Speaking together, the authors claim that the idea to write the book together was Campisi’s. “Alisa Krasnostein, the publisher of Twelfth Planet Press, was looking for proposals for her double press line,” Campisi says from her apartment in Melbourne. Currently working as a freelance writer, she has a reputation for quirky, beautifully written short fiction, and will feature in Twelve Planets, a series of twelve short story collections promoting female authors in Australia by Twelfth Planet Press. “I asked if Ben watched to pitch something with me and we came up with the idea of Above/Below pretty much on the spot. When we emailed Alisa, all we had was the title and the idea of a city falling from the sky, but it didn’t take long to go from there.”

Ben Peek

Peek agrees that the start was very organic. “We divided the two halves of the book on the strength of our prose,” he explains from the outskirts of Sydney. Splitting his time between teaching and writing, Peek is the author of a pair of critically acclaimed novels. “Out of the pair of us, Steph has the more beautiful, elegant writing, and so she ended up with Loft, a city that is essentially full of refined and cultured people. That left me with Below, the ugly, dirty secret. That kind of suits me, y’know? So I stripped back my style, left it lean and sparse, and wrote about a culture of people who really don’t have very long to live and whose life is dominated by death.

“After we had worked that out, the pair of us pretty much went off and wrote our piece, with no real hassle.”

“He’s lying terribly,” Campisi interjects over skype. “I must have gotten sixty emails in the first week from him, each with a new idea, each changing the previous, altering his plot and his world. I really had no idea what he was doing. They would appear at odd hours, too. I took to turning my phone off at night, just so I could sleep.”

“I would get emails about fruit,” Peek admits. “I got a text messages about the economy. That was about the time I started thinking of how I could blow her city up.”

Steph and Jono

“I was busy trying to work in air strikes at that stage. The quicker I destroyed him and took over his land, the better!” Campisi laughs. “No, seriously, we set up a google wave and left notes for a while before writing our pieces. We would send emails to each other every now and then, explaining a character we had created from each others city, or an event that we were working in as important history, but that was about it.”

“We actually made the decision early on not to worry too much about what the other was writing at the start,” Peek explains. “Well, I made the decision. The way I write involves a lot of editing, with me going back and forth and shifting and fixing and trashing. Nothing really stays the same after a while. Steph, though, she works a little differently, with her first drafts being much more polished and to the point than mine, so it was really a better deal to just get out of each others way and come back once we had finished.”

“When that happened, we actually found we had done a lot of things that just meshed really well,” Campisi continues. “Our two protagonists had a lot of similarities that allowed the two books to resonate throughout, and when the rewrites began, I tweaked little bits here and there to make it stronger. Devian’s wife, for example, had a much larger presence in Above after I had read Ben’s.”

“Yeah, I remember going back and altering a lot of descriptions after I read Above,” Peek adds. “Tiny things that most people probably won’t notice, I suspect, but I thought they made the two parts to mesh better. I also made my world a little dirtier. There is a moment in Above where Devian meets the diplomat, Dhormi, and Devian comments on how filthy he was. I realised that I had not allowed for that to be part of Below. I didn’t really think of crusted nails, skin with dirt lodged in the lines and wrinkles, but after I read Steph’s I thought it was pretty cool, so I went back. It was hard to do, though, because no one sits around and thinks that they’re a filthy. I worked with a guy once who had the worse body odor I had ever smelt, but he was fine with it because to him it was very natural. He was pretty cut when management spoke to him about it. So finding the right balance for that was hard, but I think I managed to strike it well enough―though it is a much stronger and more striking moment in Above, something I didn’t want to detract from.”

After they had done that, Alisa Krasnostein took the two pieces and began editing. “She did a fine job,” Campisi says. “From the outset she was really concerned with the quality of the book and did not want to put out something bad. It’s her brand, so she watches it keenly. When what we gave her meant that we would put out something inferior in the first deadline, she wasn’t afraid to push it back and push us. It was very important that the three of us stood behind the work.”

“Very much so,” Peek agrees. “While Above/Below has come out in the double press line, we want it to be considered as a novel, not just two novellas joined together. The double press format is really neat and allows for you to do something really quite different if you put the time and effort into it, and that’s what we did. We deliberately aimed to create a co-written novel that was co-written in a very different way, avoiding that style that emerges when two authors mesh their words together. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, and some authors do it very well, but we were allowed to do something different in terms of co-writing for Above/Below and we embraced that idea.”

“The final product is something we’re all proud of,” Campisi adds. “Everything meshes so well together, it has little Easter eggs buried in it, and on top of that, it is a cute book, with beautifully designed covers by Amanda Rainey.”

“Yeah, we cannot give Rainey enough credit for what she does,” Peek says. “She will probably go down as a bit of a forgotten champion for the look of the book, which is a shame because without her, I don’t think it would be the object of desire that it is.”

Above/Below is available now from the Twelfth Planet store, where it can be purchased in either its paper form or an electronic from. In conjunction with the ROR site, the authors have organised a competition that will give a book away to one reader. All you have to do is write, in five hundred words or less, what your hobby would be if you lived in a city that floated in the sky. The best idea wins a copy of Above/Below.

Posted in Australian Spec Fic Scene, Awards, Book Giveaway, Collaborating, Covers, Nourish the Writer, Publishers, Visiting Writer, Writing Craft | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Death Most Definite Launch

Posted by trentjamieson on August 9, 2010

So it’s finally happened, I’ve got me a book out, and all it needs to be is launched.

If you’re in Brisbane, free on Friday the 13th of August (that’s this Friday) come along to Avid Reader, 193 Boundary Rd, West End. My little book’s going to be seen off by Marianne de Pierres (visionary SF superstar), Paul Landymore (bookseller at large) and me (nervous writer type). It should be a lot of fun.

If you’d like to come along you need to book at Avid Reader by emailing events@avidreader.com.au or   (07) 3846 3422

You can also book online – follow the link.

Posted in Australian Spec Fic Scene, Book Launches, Covers, Promoting your Book, Publishing Industry | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

Ballgowns, Wordcounts and Podcasts

Posted by tansyrr on May 18, 2010

I had a very authory sort of day today. Two great writing sessions; I’m powering towards the final act or possibly the penultimate act of Book 3 (kind of depends on how long the book wants to be) and I finally managed to wreak some serious death and destruction, hooray!

I got an email from my editor at Voyager about cover ideas and had to spend the next half hour googling ballgowns. Yes, I DID have to do that. She called while I was googling and we chatted about a few things including new names for Books 2 & 3. I have one for 3 which works well, but we are still noodling around on 2. Nothing is perfect yet. And the more you think about these things… well, yes.

I also managed a bit of exercise, a bit of housework, a bit of blogging, a bit of shopping and a bit of reading. All this and I racked up the biggest wordcount I have in the last month and a half – around 2500 words though I wrote more than that – I also deleted quite a chunk! Had to be done.

Pretty much a perfect work day, actually. Which is a good thing, because Tuesday with the baby in daycare for the afternoon and my 5 year old picked up from school by my Dad, is the most child-free it ever gets around here. I did my first stint of writing in the morning while the baby was napping, and did all the other jobs pretty much around her. Having from 1pm until 5pm on my own in the house felt like a huge luxury – and indeed, it’s the first time I’ve had a day like that in four weeks thanks to an after school sports program that mucked my schedule up.

I won’t get another day like today for a week!

Tomorrow, my second-most childfree day in which I get 2 whole hours to myself, may not be nearly as productive, for many reasons, not least the fact that they are digging in a new power pole out the front of the house, and are cutting our power off for 8 hours. Actually it may be a super productive day because I won’t have access to the internet (sob!). Though it’s a good thing my baby doesn’t like her food heated up…

My final act of authoriness was to upload my new podcast, CreatureCourtCast#1, which contains me talking about my new book a little and reading the first chapter. I’ll be doing a few more of these over the next month because they are fun and you get to listen to me failing utterly to do manly voices, and using all the voice trills I have acquired from 5 years of reading Wind in the Willows and Charlie and Lola books. You can check it out on my site, and you should be able to find it on iTunes by tomorrow if you search for ‘tansy rayner roberts’ or ‘creature court’ or something along those lines.

If you like the CreatureCourtCast, you might also like to check out Galactic Suburbia, the SF chatty podcast I do with Alisa Krasnostein & Random Alex. We talk about… stuff. Books, awards, etc. I take off my author hat and put the reader & critic one on. Possibly that is two hats.

So think of me tomorrow! I may well spend a lot of it sitting in my car, letting the baby nap in the back seat while I tap on my internet-deprived laptop and/or read Joanna Russ books.

Posted in Covers, Creativity, Writing Craft | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Cover: Power and Majesty

Posted by tansyrr on April 18, 2010

Since it’s cover appreciation week (and if not it should be) I thought I’d pop mine up here – Power and Majesty is due out in June, and just went to print this last week, so I was finally allowed to share the pretty cover.

I had a lot more input into the cover design than I might have expected with such a big publisher – though of course there’s a big difference between ‘input’ and ‘say’. I suggested the dress depicted as being one of the iconic aspects of the book, when we were considering the possibility of a cover which just featured a design element rather than an illustration.

The final image decided upon was of the dress and its wearer Isangell, who is an integral but minor character of the book – but the image beautifully conveys the right kind of feel and style of the book. The first ‘draft’ of the cover I saw was unfinished (they wanted to check it was generally okay before adding more roses to the frock – understandably!) and depicted Isangell in a plain slip. She was standing on a balcony, and while the buildings in the background had a similar gothic feel to the end result, they also looked more ‘dark, foreboding castle on a hill’ than ‘dark, foreboding city’.

Asking for a city background was my big request! We also discussed the frock, the sky colour, and whether there should be naked boys falling out of said sky. (You have to squint, but there’s a distinct possibility that the flying shapes in the background aren’t birds, hehehe). The balcony railing vanished before the final result too, which I was pleased with because there’s an important balcony scene with a different character early on, and it might be confusing.

The cover to me feels like a really good balance between the Voyager ‘look’ and the actual story in the novel… and eeee, review copies are OUT there, so very soon people will be able to tell me whether they think the cover matches the book.

Also, for all of you who did request naked men falling from the sky on the cover, I would like to add that I have made a request for naked men fighting in a lake for Book 2. Sure, the chances are not high, but at least I asked. 😀

Posted in Covers, Publishing Industry | Tagged: , , , | 8 Comments »

KRK Covers!!!

Posted by Rowena Cory Daniells on March 17, 2010


This is it. I am so excited. The covers for books 2 and 3 have arrived.

First of all a BIG thank you is in order to the team at Solaris for selecting Clint Langley as the artist. I am so impressed with what he’s done!

I love the look of all three and I love the way they work as a design when you put the three together.

Would you pick up these books if you saw them on the shelf?

Posted in Covers | Tagged: , , , | 21 Comments »

One step closer!

Posted by Rowena Cory Daniells on March 5, 2010


Here’s the cover of book one of the Chronicles of King Rolen’s Kin. My editor tells me the next cover will be delivered soon, maybe in a week. Clint Langley is the artists and I’m really looking forward to seeing what he does with the next book cover.

Meanwhile, my editor at Solaris has sent me book two ‘The Uncrowned King’ for editing. I would like nothing more than to immerse myself totally in the book, tidying up the little glitches that he has discovered, but life gets in the way.

!Whinge Warning!

This weekend I have to mark assignments for work (I’m an associate lecturer). I have to take child number 6 to the dentist. And I’m involved in organising a national workshop, for which there was a competition to enter. This is the weekend that I have to prepare the contact emails to the 51 entrants to let them know if they have been selected to be offered a place at the workshop.

I’d be flat out, without the editing of book two. Meanwhile, we’ve decided to sell our house, so I should be cleaning, sorting and throwing out, and painting the walls where the kids have scratched them, or stuck up posters and pulled off the paint, etc.

Why can’t I just run away from life and do nothing but write? Sigh.

Does life get in the way for you? How do you find time to write?

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